HR Archive

How to foster equal opportunities and respect for diversity

International Organizations have laid down principles, and taken a rising number of initiatives to foster respect for cultural diversity and equal opportunities. But how? Here a practical example by Pascale Etemad how to foster equal opportunities and respect for diversity.

https://www.female-executive-search.com/insights/1694/

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The Epitaph of Managerialism

My mentor Dr Jules Goddard at the LBS MLab presented the following paper that I thought worth sharing with you.

He reminds us that reducing costs is only a means to an end, not a strategy.

The art of management is to manage a business in such a way that the need for operational excellence, continuous improvement, “right first time”, cost leadership, process redesign, corporate renewal, cultural change, charismatic leadership, employee engagement and financial incentives is redundant; and the declared pursuit of these objectives counts as a clear admission of failure. Continue reading

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New Leaders Transition Principles

A few pointers as each of you enter a new phase in your careers:

  • New Leaders have the opportunity to create a new image by building on past experience. The New Leader has no history or context on which people can judge so each action carries disproportionate weight.
  • Continue reading

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    Multicultural Operations – a 2 minute read

    Managing a multicultural team can be tough.

    Communication styles vary, and there may be differences in conventions around time, giving feedback, and disagreeing publicly. To overcome these differences, set clear norms and stick to them. Start by taking into account what will work best for your team as a whole.

    Be aware that there may be team members who find it harder to meet certain expectations because of their cultural backgrounds. For example, if you have established that team members must arrive at meetings exactly on time (Western-style punctuality), you’ll need to reinforce that norm consistently across the group and remind non-Westerners why being on time matters. Of course, sometimes things change and adjustment is required, but keeping a consistent, clear structure for work styles and expectations is a critical way to create a common-ground team culture. Continue reading

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    Women back in business

    What holds Women back in business?

    by Janet Clark

    Some of the most powerful people of today’s world are women. They are leading nations and fortune 500 companies and are holding up extremely well in a male dominated world, bringing change and new perspectives to the established ways of doing politics or business and setting new standards. There are numerous examples where women did prove their business acumen and ability to tackle the odds of a global business world – on many occasions, with considerable more sensitivity and foresight as their male counterparts – and with better results, as noted by a study (Catalyst, 2007, Grant Thornton) : In his study, companies with a higher proportion of women on their board had significant higher returns on invested capital, returns on equity, and sales. Continue reading

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    Hiring the best people

    “You can’t send a duck to eagle school”

    You have to admit,  when you saw the headline of Colin Thompson’s short article. Ducks? Eagles? What’s this to do with business? But you will be simply stunned by the truth behind this kind of funny sentence. What about you? Do you think you can train a duck to become an eagle?

    A few years ago I had lunch with a top executive from a company known for their legendary retail service. My wife and I are both huge fans, and over lunch I shared with him some of the great service stories his people had provided the Thompson family.
    I said, “With the service your people give…you must have a training manual 2 inches thick.”
    He looked up and said, “Colin, we do not have a training manual. What we do is find the best people we can find and we empower them to do whatever it takes to satisfy the customer.”
    Then he said something I’ll never forget. He said, “We learned a long time ago that you cannot send a duck to eagle school.” Read the complete article on hiring the best peolple written by top executive Colin Thompson Continue reading

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    CV Writing Mistakes

    How to avoid CV writing mistakes? The 15 most common mistakes

    Written by Colin Thompson The same common CV mistakes crop up time and time again. Too many jobseekers miss out on their dream job because of a small number of easily avoided blunders. These tips come from a comprehensive analysis of over 2,500 CVs to derive a ‘Top 15’ most common CV writing mistakes: 1. Inclusion of photographs People often include photos of themselves on their CV. Don’t! Unless you are applying to be a model or wish to work as an actor/actress then including a photo with/on your CV is definitely not recommended – at least not within the UK. 2. Inappropriate heading Your CV should be headed with your name – and just your name – boldly and clearly – before any other details – contact details, etc. They should no longer be headed ‘Curriculum Vitae’ or ‘CV’. It’s very old-fashioned. 3. Missing or inappropriate email addresses Whilst having no email address at all on your CV is clearly a problem, it’s not something I see very often. Far more common is the use of fun or jokey email addresses. Whilst these may be fine for corresponding with friends and family, employers will probably regard more ‘serious’ email addresses as simply more professional. 4. Superfluous personal details at the top of the CV My clients often feel that it is compulsory to include details such as their marital status, nationality, number (and ages) of children/dependants, etc. Whilst, yes, it certainly used to be the norm to include this sort of information on a CV, it is now increasingly rare, given modern anti-discrimination legislation, to find these sorts of details on a CV. They simply aren’t relevant. 5. Lack of clear section headings/separation of sections It is vitally important for your CV to be easy for the reader to scan quickly and, to this end, clear section headings and separation of sections is essential. I often recommend the use of lines or other graphic devices in this respect, although there are other ways of achieving a clearer separation. …Read more CV Writing mistakes
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